Another takeaway is that these are still early days for data and news analysis. While the Twitter study is intriguing, it is presented (appropriately) in the language of science — “edge/node ratios,” “ego network details” and so on. This means it may take time for the study’s implications to be translated into everyday guidance for publishers and editors. The title of the study, first reported by the University of Arizona, is “Sharing News Articles Using 140 Characters: A Diffusion Analysis on Twitter.” It examined tweets from three US news outlets (The New York Times, National Public Radio, and The Washington Post); three non-US outlets (BBC, Reuters , and The Guardian); three financial News Agencies (Financial Times , Forbes, and Bloomberg); and three tech news sites Ars Technica, Mashable, and Wired. (via What news brand has the most pull on Twitter? Finally, some answers — paidContent)

Another takeaway is that these are still early days for data and news analysis. While the Twitter study is intriguing, it is presented (appropriately) in the language of science — “edge/node ratios,” “ego network details” and so on. This means it may take time for the study’s implications to be translated into everyday guidance for publishers and editors. The title of the study, first reported by the University of Arizona, is “Sharing News Articles Using 140 Characters: A Diffusion Analysis on Twitter.” It examined tweets from three US news outlets (The New York Times, National Public Radio, and The Washington Post); three non-US outlets (BBC, Reuters , and The Guardian); three financial News Agencies (Financial Times , Forbes, and Bloomberg); and three tech news sites Ars Technica, Mashable, and Wired. (via What news brand has the most pull on Twitter? Finally, some answers — paidContent)

()